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CRUNCH: Crucial conversations over lunch

Learning series for business leaders

HMC Communications introduces: CRUNCH, crucial conversations over lunch.

This 90-minute lunchtime learning series tackles topics, issues and concerns shared by most business leaders no matter what industry they operate within.

HMC is excited to launch our CRUNCH series with guest speaker, Dr Ryan Ko, a world-leading expert on cybersecurity.

During this workshop, Ryan will briefly set the scene to introduce the current state of cybercrime in New Zealand. He and the HMC team will then lead you through an interactive desktop exercise simulating a cyberattack scenario using an actual real event as the basis.

You’ll walk away with:
1. A better understanding of cybersecurity risks to your organisation
2. Information and referrals to resources you can use to get better prepared
3. An appreciation for how your organisation can communicate well during a cyberattack crisis
CRUNCH is developed for business owners, managers and senior leaders. This workshop is not geared for IT professionals.


Tuesday 28 November, 12-1.30pm

Waikato Innovation Park conference centre
First floor, Gallagher Building (above DeVice café)
PRICE: $50
Includes catered light lunch, tea, coffee

RSVP to heather@hmc-communications.co.nz


Limited to 20 attendees.


About Dr Ryan Ko

Dr Ryan Ko is the Director of the NZ Institute for Security and Crime Science. As an Associate Professor with the Computer Science department of the University of Waikato, he established New Zealand’s first cybersecurity graduate programme and lab (https://crow.org.nz) since 2012.
He is an advisor to major international organisations, including Interpol and the United Nations. He also consults to NZ government agencies including NZ Police, the Defence Force, Ministry of Justice and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

He is an international faculty member with the National Information Assurance Training and Education Center (NIATEC) at Idaho State University. Prior to his academic career, he was a lead computer scientist with Hewlett-Packard Labs – some of his inventions are now used in security monitoring tools used by government agencies around the world.